Critical wastewater infrastructure is at risk from more intense and frequent storm events and rising sea levels, these US case studies demonstrate how communities can evaluate and prioritise flood resiliency into planning, design, and construction.   

The recent flooding in New Zealand highlights the need to protect critical wastewater infrastructure from the increasing risks associated with more intense and frequent storm events and rising sea levels.

This presentation will discuss how communities in the US are incorporating accommodations for projected changes in storm intensity and frequency into flood resilience evaluation, design and construction. These case studies examine infrastructure along complex coastal shorelines, open ocean, tidally influenced coastal ponds, and inland river flood plains.

The US is facing similar challenges to New Zealand, and we must incorporate the values of Kaitiakitanga to support adaptation of our infrastructure to climate change. Communities in both countries have limited funds, and these case studies highlight how a community can evaluate and prioritise both the risks and mitigation measures and thus better protect their critical wastewater infrastructure from the increasing risks associated with more intense and frequent storm events and rising sea levels.

Lenna Quackenbush

GHD

Lenna Quackenbush is a Water Engineer with GHD, based out of their Hamilton office. She recently made the move from the USA to join the team in New Zealand. Lenna’s work experience encompasses wastewater infrastructure planning, design and construction with a focus on process design of wastewater treatment facilities. She received a bachelor’s of science in chemical engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute, in the USA. In her free time Lenna is enjoying exploring her new country, hiking and spending time in nature.
3.45pm

Emerging Members Presentations

Tuesday 21 May